Clean water in the bag

An innovative, tea bag-like water filter could provide millions of people with clean and safe drinking water.
Professor Eugene Cloete with tea bag water filter.
Professor Eugene Cloete with tea bag water filter.

Having access to safe drinking water is something that most of us take for granted. Yet some 300 million people on the African continent do not enjoy this privilege.

A high-tech “tea bag” developed by researchers at Stellenbosch University may go a long way in eradicating this problem. Professor Eugene Cloete, microbiologist and dean of the Faculty of Science at the university, harnessed knowledge about water purification, food microbiology and nanotechnology to develop this tea bags that works as a water filter and fits easily into the neck of a bottle

The filter was developed using tiny nano-fibres that have been packed together into a teabag-like package that is able to filter out the microscopic bacteria. The nanotech bag contains activated carbon, which is able to kill harmful bacteria. The teabag filter then cleans the polluted water as one drinks from the bottle.

Cloete describes the teabag filter as a “decentralised” technology that takes the solution to the actual point of use. This teabag filter will not only empower vulnerable communities with clean drinking water, but would also appeal to outdoor enthusiasts on hiking or camping trips.

Having access to safe drinking water is something that most of us take for granted. Yet some 300 million people on the African continent do not enjoy this privilege.

A high-tech “tea bag” developed by researchers at Stellenbosch University may go a long way in eradicating this problem. Professor Eugene Cloete, microbiologist and dean of the Faculty of Science at the university, harnessed knowledge about water purification, food microbiology and nanotechnology to develop this tea bags that works as a water filter and fits easily into the neck of a bottle

The filter was developed using tiny nano-fibres that have been packed together into a teabag-like package that is able to filter out the microscopic bacteria. The nanotech bag contains activated carbon, which is able to kill harmful bacteria. The teabag filter then cleans the polluted water as one drinks from the bottle.

Cloete describes the teabag filter as a “decentralised” technology that takes the solution to the actual point of use. This teabag filter will not only empower vulnerable communities with clean drinking water, but would also appeal to outdoor enthusiasts on hiking or camping trips.

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